Saturday, March 15, 2014

Chocolate Rocks?!?

This year I have a fifth grade group, sixth grade group, and a science/social studies group.

During the time I have the fifth and sixth grade group, I teach them reading, English (language arts), and math.

My science and social studies group has only 3 students.  These 3 students do not take the same standardized test that my other 11 do so that's why I teach them science and social studies.

We have been learning about the rock cycle and different types of rocks this quarter so I told them we would make rocks out of chocolate.  They have been waiting patiently or not so patiently for this opportunity.  :)

So on Friday I finally brought in the materials for this project.

For the igneous rocks (rocks that form from heat - molten rock - lava), we discussed/reviewed how the Earth is hot below the crust and is made of plates.  These plates come together (converge) and either form mountains or volcanoes or cause earthquakes.  We discussed how the lava flows out of the volcano and then cools.  Depending on fast or slow it cools, grains will either be large and visible or small and not visible.  Granite versus basalt and pumice

For the sedimentary rocks (rocks that form from pressure), we discussed/reviewed how sediment falls into bodies of water.  These pieces of sediment fall to the bottom of the body of water.  Pressure from the water causes them to sink into the sand/mud that is at the bottom of the body of water.  Over time those pieces of sediment will cement together to form sedimentary rocks.  Fossils are an example of sedimentary rock.

The chocolate by it's self are the igneous rocks.  The chocolate with all the sprinkles are the sedimentary rocks.  One of my students went a little overboard with the sprinkles.

Igneous rocks:

Stars of the project:
  • cookie sheet
  • parchment paper
  • microwavable bowl
  • spoon
  • chocolate chips (I used 1/4 c. for 3 kids.)


Steps:

  1. Discuss what is needed for igneous rocks to form.
  2. Melt the chocolate.  (I did for 1 min. and then stirred until it was melted.  If it is not melted, heat it up in 30 second intervals.)
  3. Drop it onto parchment lined cookie sheets.
  4. Allow to harden.
  5. Eat.

Sedimentary rocks:


  • cookie sheet
  • parchment paper
  • microwavable bowl
  • spoon
  • Some sort of sediment (I used sprinkles.)
  • chocolate chips (I used 1/4 c. for 3 kids.)

Steps:

  1. Discuss what is needed for sedimentary rocks to form.
  2. Melt the chocolate. (I did for 1 min. and then stirred until it was melted.  If it is not melted, heat it up in 30 second intervals.)
  3. Spread a thin layer of chocolate on the parchment lined cookie sheet.  (That layer is the sand/mud at the bottom of a body of water.)
  4. Sprinkle your sediment over the thin layer of chocolate.
  5. Press down the sediment down with a bottom of a spoon.  (If your kid is anything like my students, you may need to add a little bit more chocolate.)
  6. Allow to harden.
  7. Eat
I also had my students help clean up after we were finished.  I covered the chocolate rocks with parchment paper and we are going to eat them on Monday.  I'm lucky I have a lot of cabinet space in my room because we put the cookie sheet in there so it's safe.


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